Woman Looks To Marshal Post

SARDIS – Sardis native Cathy Jones said she learned early on not to tell her family about her adventures on the job with the U.S. Marshals Service.

That’s because she has twice encountered someone with a weapon during her 17-year career.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, this week recommended Jones, 40, to be the next U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. A committee comprised largely of law enforcement officials from the northern part of Ohio recommended her to Brown from among 11 applicants.

Jones is currently the Chief Deputy U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. The Southern District has court locations in Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton and serves more than 5 million citizens in 48 Ohio counties.

She must next be appointed to the job by President Barack Obama, and have that appointment approved by the U.S. Senate.

“It’s the first step in a long process, but it was the major hurdle,” Jones said. “There were a number of other qualified candidates. I’m honored that Sen. Brown recommended me, and I’m proud to represent the Ohio Valley.

“While I’m very excited, I’m still approaching the process. There are no guarantees I will get the position.”

U.S. Attorneys are responsible for the prosecution of criminal cases brought by the federal government, the prosecution and defense of civil cases in which the United States is a party, and the collection of debts owed to the federal government.

U.S. Marshals also are responsible for protecting the federal judiciary, apprehending federal fugitives, and overseeing the Witness Protection Program, among other responsibilities.

There are 94 federal court districts across the U.S., and a U.S. Marshal is appointed for each.

Jones noted that under the last administration, just two U.S. Marshals were female. Still, she said working for the U.S. Marshals Service “is an excellent profession” for women.

“Most of the barriers women have experienced in the past were about decisions to raise a family,” Jones commented. “Today it is definitely a family-friendly agency.”

Jones, who is single, presently lives in Galena, Ohio.

“My family is my immediate family and the U.S. Marshals office,” she said. She returns to Sardis once a month to visit her immediate family.

Jones is the daughter of Keith and the late Belva Jones of Sardis. She is a 1987 graduate of River High School, where she was a scholar-athlete.

Jones majored in criminal justice at Ohio Dominican College, and she said she chose that profession because she is a more physical type of person.

“I knew I didn’t want to be behind a desk,” she continued. “I wanted to meet different people. This job fulfilled my desires at the time.”

Jones has served as chief of the Office of Recruiting and Chief of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) Program within the U.S. Marshals Service.

In addition, she has held positions within the U.S. Marshals Service in the Northern District of West Virginia, the Western District of Pennsylvania, the Northern District of Ohio and the Southern District of Ohio.

In 2008, she received both the Crime Stoppers Law Enforcement Officer of the Year Award and the Outstanding Performance Award from the U.S. Marshals Service.

Woman Looks To Marshal Post

SARDIS – Sardis native Cathy Jones said she learned early on not to tell her family about her adventures on the job with the U.S. Marshals Service.

That’s because she has twice encountered someone with a weapon during her 17-year career.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, this week recommended Jones, 40, to be the next U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. A committee comprised largely of law enforcement officials from the northern part of Ohio recommended her to Brown from among 11 applicants.

Jones is currently the Chief Deputy U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. The Southern District has court locations in Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton and serves more than 5 million citizens in 48 Ohio counties.

She must next be appointed to the job by President Barack Obama, and have that appointment approved by the U.S. Senate.

“It’s the first step in a long process, but it was the major hurdle,” Jones said. “There were a number of other qualified candidates. I’m honored that Sen. Brown recommended me, and I’m proud to represent the Ohio Valley.

“While I’m very excited, I’m still approaching the process. There are no guarantees I will get the position.”

U.S. Attorneys are responsible for the prosecution of criminal cases brought by the federal government, the prosecution and defense of civil cases in which the United States is a party, and the collection of debts owed to the federal government.

U.S. Marshals also are responsible for protecting the federal judiciary, apprehending federal fugitives, and overseeing the Witness Protection Program, among other responsibilities.

There are 94 federal court districts across the U.S., and a U.S. Marshal is appointed for each.

Jones noted that under the last administration, just two U.S. Marshals were female. Still, she said working for the U.S. Marshals Service “is an excellent profession” for women.

“Most of the barriers women have experienced in the past were about decisions to raise a family,” Jones commented. “Today it is definitely a family-friendly agency.”

Jones, who is single, presently lives in Galena, Ohio.

“My family is my immediate family and the U.S. Marshals office,” she said. She returns to Sardis once a month to visit her immediate family.

Jones is the daughter of Keith and the late Belva Jones of Sardis. She is a 1987 graduate of River High School, where she was a scholar-athlete.

Jones majored in criminal justice at Ohio Dominican College, and she said she chose that profession because she is a more physical type of person.

“I knew I didn’t want to be behind a desk,” she continued. “I wanted to meet different people. This job fulfilled my desires at the time.”

Jones has served as chief of the Office of Recruiting and Chief of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) Program within the U.S. Marshals Service.

In addition, she has held positions within the U.S. Marshals Service in the Northern District of West Virginia, the Western District of Pennsylvania, the Northern District of Ohio and the Southern District of Ohio.

In 2008, she received both the Crime Stoppers Law Enforcement Officer of the Year Award and the Outstanding Performance Award from the U.S. Marshals Service.

Woman Looks To Marshal Post

SARDIS – Sardis native Cathy Jones said she learned early on not to tell her family about her adventures on the job with the U.S. Marshals Service.

That’s because she has twice encountered someone with a weapon during her 17-year career.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, this week recommended Jones, 40, to be the next U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. A committee comprised largely of law enforcement officials from the northern part of Ohio recommended her to Brown from among 11 applicants.

Jones is currently the Chief Deputy U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. The Southern District has court locations in Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton and serves more than 5 million citizens in 48 Ohio counties.

She must next be appointed to the job by President Barack Obama, and have that appointment approved by the U.S. Senate.

“It’s the first step in a long process, but it was the major hurdle,” Jones said. “There were a number of other qualified candidates. I’m honored that Sen. Brown recommended me, and I’m proud to represent the Ohio Valley.

“While I’m very excited, I’m still approaching the process. There are no guarantees I will get the position.”

U.S. Attorneys are responsible for the prosecution of criminal cases brought by the federal government, the prosecution and defense of civil cases in which the United States is a party, and the collection of debts owed to the federal government.

U.S. Marshals also are responsible for protecting the federal judiciary, apprehending federal fugitives, and overseeing the Witness Protection Program, among other responsibilities.

There are 94 federal court districts across the U.S., and a U.S. Marshal is appointed for each.

Jones noted that under the last administration, just two U.S. Marshals were female. Still, she said working for the U.S. Marshals Service “is an excellent profession” for women.

“Most of the barriers women have experienced in the past were about decisions to raise a family,” Jones commented. “Today it is definitely a family-friendly agency.”

Jones, who is single, presently lives in Galena, Ohio.

“My family is my immediate family and the U.S. Marshals office,” she said. She returns to Sardis once a month to visit her immediate family.

Jones is the daughter of Keith and the late Belva Jones of Sardis. She is a 1987 graduate of River High School, where she was a scholar-athlete.

Jones majored in criminal justice at Ohio Dominican College, and she said she chose that profession because she is a more physical type of person.

“I knew I didn’t want to be behind a desk,” she continued. “I wanted to meet different people. This job fulfilled my desires at the time.”

Jones has served as chief of the Office of Recruiting and Chief of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) Program within the U.S. Marshals Service.

In addition, she has held positions within the U.S. Marshals Service in the Northern District of West Virginia, the Western District of Pennsylvania, the Northern District of Ohio and the Southern District of Ohio.

In 2008, she received both the Crime Stoppers Law Enforcement Officer of the Year Award and the Outstanding Performance Award from the U.S. Marshals Service.