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Brine Wastewater Leak Investigated

February 28, 2013

DALLAS — Officials want to know how 2,264 barrels of brine wastewater leaked from a storage pit into a local tributary of Big Wheeling Creek in Marshall County on Friday....

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(36)

mikeyd

Feb-28-13 8:08 AM

i said it before that these people will dump this "stuff" wherever they can get away with it.gas company officials-federal government.when they refuse to tell us what is in this "stuff" that is being dumped into our waterways and spillage on the land you have to wonder which hand is washing which.

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woodworkingmenace

Feb-28-13 8:46 AM

Its so 'convenient' to tell an employee to open a valve at night, and let the water 'flow' when they get too much, so that they dont have to haul it away and pay for it... Why cant they take this to a proper wastewater plant and pay them to process the water properly? The BOD (biochemical oxygen demand) loading would be calculated and adjusted for, so that they can absorb the water and do whats needed to clean it up. I wish you well...

Jesse

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idliketoknow

Feb-28-13 10:31 AM

This "spill" pales in comparison to the amount of road salt washed into our streams daily from snow trucks. Bias much?

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mikeyd

Feb-28-13 11:17 AM

we know what chemicals are in road salt.

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WVUGEO

Feb-28-13 11:55 AM

Everyone commenting here so far has missed the most critical point: The radium. It will, absolutely, cause horrific health problems on down the road. And, the Marcellus is loaded with it. In the decade or so after World War II, the US Geologic Survey was directed to assess the Marcellus, and some other deep shale formations, such as the Chattanooga and one or two others that are now being drilled for gas, as a source of radioactive raw materials, primarily uranium, which decays into radium and radon, for atomic weapons manufacture.

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 1:33 PM

WVUGEO, radium? “Horrific” health problems? “Atomic weapons”? Seriously? Laughable fear mongering. WVU’s finest. LOL

Tell us how much uranium the USGS found they could obtain from the Marcellus. Give us some actual laboratory numbers about radium concentrations found in fracking fluid. Don’t type all the zeros in a row, though. You’ll crash the web page. LOL

Maybe, after your coal to gasoline scam and your CO2 to fuel scams fail, Appalachian uranium mining could be your next scam.

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UNCOMMONSENSE

Feb-28-13 5:49 PM

Accidental on purpose??

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UNCOMMONSENSE

Feb-28-13 5:50 PM

As I said from day one

"don't drink the water!!!"

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UNCOMMONSENSE

Feb-28-13 5:53 PM

Any fines should be used to build a new 500 bed CANCER treatment facility to handle the massive surge in cases that will undoubtedly appear a few years down the road!!!

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CleanWater

Feb-28-13 6:26 PM

Idliketoknow, I'll tell you what you need to know: road salt pales in comparison to brine because the equivalent amount of salt spread on roads is diffuse across hundreds of square miles of land, not all dumped into one creek all at once.

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 7:10 PM

...and then it rains, and that road salt-laden water runs into storm drains and streams, and goes... INTO THE RIVER. TONS of it. Same for TONS of fertilizers, pesticides, cleansers, detergents, bleaches, pharmaceuticals, ...

But since none of you put any of THOSE on your driveways or yards or down your drains you can feel perfectly justified about demonizing drilling companies for an occasional spill. Because if you DID let all that ice melt and fertilizer and bug spray and bleach and weed killer go into the environment, and then had the gall to demonize the company that provides the fuel that keeps you from FREEZING in the winter for occasionally ALSO spilling some of those things, well, that would make you a HYPOCRITE.

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CleanWater

Feb-28-13 7:35 PM

Troll this is a good chew toy for you. But rivers have something called assimilative capacity where they have some resiliency to pollution (able to take pollutants in diluted form over time). The spill was concentrated salt (typical brine is 500,000 mg/l TDS). Do some math and it comes out to 289 short tons of salt from this 1 spill of 2600 barrels. That's like dumping 29 trucks of salt into 1 stream in hours. No assimilative capacity. Just cuz I use gas to heat doesn't make this violation of water laws acceptable. You accept it cuz yer an idiot.

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oldsteelmaker

Feb-28-13 7:48 PM

Clean, you are partially right, probably killed some minnows and crawdads. The population of both will probably be back to normal in a month or so. And once it's in the river, you won't ever notice it.

Let's see... 2264 barrels times 42 gallons per barrel, times 3 pounds of salt solubility limit at 68F per gallon is roughly 143 tons of salt.

You might want to check what Pittsburgh buys per winter, most of which washes into the Ohio. Tens of thousands of tons, and it barely raises the concentration level in the river enough to make any difference. Certainly not enough to make it any problem to drink, it passes Federal and state drinking water standards at it's peak every spring. Only people I ever heard any complaints from worked at Yorkville, where the higher chloride levels caused some surface problems on the tinplate.

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oldsteelmaker

Feb-28-13 7:54 PM

Clean, I think you are off by a factor of two. Actually probably more, since the solubility limit I used was for 68F, and it's a little chillier than that.

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CleanWater

Feb-28-13 8:05 PM

Thanks oldsteelmaker. Brine Salt already in solution though is conservative and will mix in any stream water. So that is not true for calcium chloride crystals. Thanks. Every flowing stream is created equal under the CWA. It was a tributary of wheeling creek that was polluted. The company will get fined as they should.

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oldsteelmaker

Feb-28-13 8:07 PM

Geo, I keep hearing this stuff about the radium. What utter nonsense.

What is shale? It's fossilized MUD. Worn down rocks. Yes there is some uranium in there. How much is in the rocks around the area? After all, that mud was produced from the rocks in the area. The Shale Fairy didn't bring it from the Rockies or the White Mountains.

So if the original rocks contained parts per million of uranium, and radium is one of the breakdown products of uranium, and most uranium does NOT turn into radium, where the bleep do you think enough radium to be dangerous will come from????

A lot of people have been talking about the "low information voter" recently. We have a prime example here of the "no information commenter".

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oldsteelmaker

Feb-28-13 8:09 PM

Calcium chloride is more soluble, but frack water salt is from the shale, and it's fossilized sea water in there, good old NaCl.

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 8:20 PM

CleanWater “typical brine is 500,000 mg/l TDS”

Hey Einstein, SATURATED brine is less than 400,000 mg/l. And flowback fracking fluid is NO WHERE NEAR saturated. oldsteelmaker beat me to the punch at proving what a dolt you are when it comes to the rest of your “data.”

And the bottom line is that little spill is NOTHING compared to the salt the Ohio Valley dumps on the roads every time it snows. Not to mention the THOUSANDS of tons of chemicals FAR more noxious than salt and the other filth YOU and the rest of the HYPOCRITES like you dump into the Ohio Valley watershed every day.

Here you go. Don’t choke on your chew toy, puppy. LOL

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 8:28 PM

Hey CleanWater, now tell us about your 78 mpg Prius. The one the apparently you only drive downhill. LOL

Liberals should have to get a license to use numbers.

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CleanWater

Feb-28-13 8:33 PM

600,000 mg/l

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 8:48 PM

364,000 mg/l at 100 F. LOWER at lower temperatures, like winter here.

w ww.alkar.c om/download/pdf/Sodium%20Chloride%20Brine%20Tables%20for%2060F.pdf

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 8:49 PM

The point is you liberals stoop to shamelessly inflating numbers (78 mpg Prius? 500k mg/l brine?) and babbling out of context pseudoscience (“road salt pales in comparison to brine,” “No assimilative capacity”) and just spewing bold-faced lies (atomic weapons-grade uranium in the Marcellus? deadly radium concentrations?) because you believe your progressive agenda justifies it.

Consequently, nobody can believe a thing you lying leftists say any more. If you told me water was wet, I’d have to take three showers just to check, recheck, and recheck again. LOL

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CleanWater

Feb-28-13 9:00 PM

I won't bicker over a couple hundred thousand mg/l when toxicity to many aquatic organisms is in the hundreds to a couple of thousand. This was a significant pollution event and you don't think this company deserves to be fined and these spills should be stopped? Assimilative capacity of the immediate receiving water body is critical in this discussion.

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 9:13 PM

Yeah. Let’s not bicker over numbers when your numbers are proven to be lies. Let’s focus on a few dead minnows. Oh, wait a minute. “No fish kill” - DEP. Well, maybe you could go out and throw a few dead fish in that stream and check again tomorrow. Because let’s not bicker over whether the brine or the fish market killed the fish. Because the cause is more important than the truth. Right? Right.

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TrollSlayer

Feb-28-13 9:20 PM

And CleanWater, stop putting words in my mouth. “you don’t think this company deserves to be fined and these spills should be stopped”? I never said that, so that’s a lie, too.

Of course laws should be enforced, and spills should be stopped. But you green Nazis go far beyond that. You intentionally spread lies in an effort to kill an entire industry. Which kills jobs and kills our economy and kills our nation’s future. And THAT kind of destruction needs to be stopped, too.

600,000 mg/l? Seriously? Just had to up the lie another notch, didn’t you. Too funny.

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