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Drilling Eyed as Possible Cause Of Off-Color Water in Pa. Town

March 11, 2013

PITTSBURGH (AP) — What causes clear, fresh country well water to turn orange or black, or smell so bad that it’s undrinkable? Residents of a western Pennsylvania community have been trying for more......

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WVUGEO

Mar-11-13 7:36 AM

What this newspaper steadfastly refuses to report to you is that similar problems have occurred in nearly every other place gas drilling, with fracking, has taken place, from the Catskill Mountains of eastern PA to the state of Wyoming. The US EPA has been as ambiguous as possible. They are hobbled by their one-time embrace of gas an alternative to coal and by a statute of law commonly referred to as the "Halliburton Loophole". Ask the editor of this rag to explain that law to you - the sum of it is that there is no way to legally and definitively determine if a chemical in well water has come from fracking. The drilling industry, by other reports, has steadfastly refused one simple way to resolve the issue: Publicly add one harmless, but unmistakable and unarguable, "marker" chemical to their frack fluids, which would indisputably identify any well water contamination coming from them.

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WVUGEO

Mar-11-13 8:00 AM

The water contamination issue might, in fact, be far worse that publicly suspected. The ancient shales, like the Marcellus, through geologic processes, became reservoirs of radioactive elements. The Marcellus, after WWII, was assessed as a source of materials for making atomic bombs by the US Geologic Survey. A study not yet published by Penn State University, "Geochemical evaluation of flowback brine from Marcellus gas wells in Pennsylvania, USA", reveals that Penn State tested flowback from fracked gas wells and found concentrations of Radium that were, as they put it: "commonly hundreds of times the US drinking water standards".

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DenverMac

Mar-11-13 8:31 AM

Flowback water is not safe to drink! Glad you figured that out for us Geo.

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Hefner

Mar-11-13 9:36 AM

We will be out of potable water by the time someone exposes the definitive truth about fracking and the damage it does to our environment.

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mikeyd

Mar-11-13 9:56 AM

there is a reason that nobody knows what's in this stuff.the government lets them dump whatever they want[and it doesn't matter what]into the ground and the commoners aren't allowed to know.these gas companies have the epa and the dep in their pockets.when it comes to the government money talks and these gas companies have it.when the chemicals are a secret then you know something is up.then they worry about parking lot runoff.these gas people will be out of here shortly.they know how long it takes for these chemicals to wick to the surface.this stuff will run uphill.the soil is our sponge.

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idliketoknow

Mar-11-13 10:07 AM

WVUGEO you're starting to sound like a broken record. I'll play along: please show me just one scholarly paper that proves hydraulic fracturing directly causes groundwater contamination. Hint: there are none.

Thanks for playing!

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TrollSlayer

Mar-11-13 6:04 PM

WVUGEO “What this newspaper steadfastly refuses to report to you is that similar problems have occurred in nearly every other place gas drilling blah blah blah blah blah...”

What WVU’s not-so-finest GEO stubbornly refuses to admit to you is that similar problems have occurred where as drilling has NOT been done, either. Earth to GEO: Water contamination happens for LOTS of reasons other than fracking. And when scientific testing shows the contamination described in this article is NOT from fracking, guess what? It’s NOT from fracking. Yet you continue to misuse anecdotes like this one to advance your anti-gas, anti-drilling agenda. That’s dishonest and shows how little documented evidence you have to support your foolish, unscientific speculations.

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TrollSlayer

Mar-11-13 6:11 PM

WVUGEO “concentrations of Radium that were, as they put it: ‘commonly hundreds of times the US drinking water standards’”

Waste water from every industrial process I can think of contains chemicals in concentrations that make them unsafe to drink. Your home sewage contains chemicals that makes them unsafe to drink. Are you advocating shutting down every industrial and public source of waste water you can’t drink? Your comparison of flowback water to drinking water again shows how little real evidence you have of the supposed dangers of fracking here.

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TrollSlayer

Mar-11-13 6:12 PM

WVUGEO, here are some documented facts for you. The radium content for three different studies of a total of 52 Marcellus wells was documented by the USGS in this paper. pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5135/ The median total Radium value for the three studies was 2460 picocuries per liter. The limit for drinking water is 5 picocuries per liter. That means if you dilute Marcellus-produced fluid with 500 parts water to 1 part flowback the mixture meets Radium standards FOR DRINKING WATER. More simply, if you dump it in the river, the Radium content of the mixture BECOMES NEGLIGIBLE. Documented facts beat undocumented anecdotes. Now go back to screaming RADIATION! again, since you have no point with actual numbers so your fearmongering and pseudoscience will have to do.

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TrollSlayer

Mar-11-13 6:19 PM

WVUGEO “The Marcellus, after WWII, was assessed as a source of materials for making atomic bombs by the US Geologic Survey.”

And what did the US Geologic Survey conclude about all that nuclear material under our feet? Comical that you would name-drop a USGS study that proved you wrong. Maybe, after your coal to gasoline scam and your CO2 to fuel scams fail, Appalachian uranium mining could be your next scam. LOL

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whgfeeling

Mar-12-13 10:33 AM

now shots are being fired at these sites. it's welcome to see they are pulling out..watching them move or uproot their rv's. it's about time.

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TrollSlayer

Mar-12-13 12:39 PM

So liberal loon whgfeeling is now supporting domestic terrorism. Figures.

I hope the shooters are caught, tried, convicted, and imprisoned for a minimum of 20 years, no parole. Executed if their terrorism results in murder.

w ww.stargazette.c om/viewart/20130311/NEWS11/303110066/Shots-fired-W-Pa-gas-drilling-site

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WVUGEO

Mar-12-13 5:05 PM

Troll: The USGS review or radioactive elements in the Marcellus and other shales is: "'Geology and Geochemistry of Uranium in Marine Black Shales: Uranium in Carbonaceous Rocks, A Review'; 1961 Vernon Swanson; US Geological Survey Paper 356-C; Prepared on behalf of the US Atomic Energy Commission." There's plenty of radioactive ore in the shale, but, it was easier and cheaper to mine it from rare earth deposits in the Southwest or buy it from Canada.

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WVUGEO

Mar-12-13 5:08 PM

Troll, or, for whoever asked: Troll: The Penn State report concerning the Radium content of frack wastes is "Geochemical evaluation of flowback brine from Marcellus gas wells in Pennsylvania, USA", by: Lara O. Haluszczak, Arthur W. Rose and Lee R. Kump; Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University. It has been accepted for publication this year in the scientific journal, "Applied Geochemistry".

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TrollSlayer

Mar-12-13 9:39 PM

Marcellus, there’s also “plenty” of gold dissolved in the world’s oceans. I probably shouldn’t tell you that, though, because I’m sure you can work a scam with it.

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TrollSlayer

Mar-12-13 11:00 PM

Not Marcellus. WVUGEO. It’s easy to get you loons mixed up.

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