Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | Home RSS
 
 
 

Frack Water Plant Cheered

April 20, 2013

Do not expect Lee Landon to be among those protesting GreenHunter Water’s planned natural gas frack water recycling plant at 2 p.m. Sunday at Warwood Garden Par....

« Back to Article

 
 
sort: oldest | newest

Comments

(39)

WVUGEO

Apr-20-13 7:35 AM

"This water is going to go somewhere, so the best way to get rid of it is to put it on barges." Where are the barges going to go? One reason there has been a hold up on Coast Guard approval (a similar project near Charleston, according to old reports, is similarly delayed) is the toxicity and potential radioactivity of the wastes. If a barge cracks up, anyone downstream who relies on the river for municipal water is in trouble.

4 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TheRealityPolice

Apr-20-13 7:59 AM

I agree with your premise somewhat but your argument is flawed. "If a barge cracks up, anyone downstream who relies on the river for municipal water is in trouble." - How many years did Weirton's raw sewage dump into the Ohio River? It was MANY years I recall.

3 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

justmytake

Apr-20-13 8:10 AM

Let me see if I got this right. For years this facility brought in gasoline on barges to holding tanks, then distributed the gasoline in taker trucks around the valley. Now they want to use these same tanks to haul in used fracking fluid and remove same by barges. Why was there not outcry when, for years GASOLINE was stored there?? I'm confused. Gasoline is a cancer causing highly flammable agent. Fracking fluid equally dangerous from a health standpoint but won't explode?? Hmm.

1 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

Apr-20-13 8:23 AM

This has nothing to do with transporting hazardous materials by barge. Lots of hazardous materials are transported by barge. This is ALL about another attack by the anti-gas anti-industry anti-capitalism loons to shut down the gas industry.

If an accident occurred, and you dumped the entire contents of a fracking fluid-filled barge into the Ohio River, the dilution factor would render the mixture completely harmless. Safer than gasoline, oil, coal, or lots of other materials transported by barge. Do the math and prove me wrong.

2 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

joeknows

Apr-20-13 9:51 AM

No one is cheering for this but the 1% or the mentally challenged. Go back to Texas Greenhunters.

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

goodwine

Apr-20-13 9:58 AM

I'm guessing Lee Landon either works for the gas industry, or has been promised a job there or just does not care about his property values or health. Moron. and the rep from the company is feeding the typical BS lines.

3 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

mikeyd

Apr-20-13 10:29 AM

this is trash that is produced by companies that originate from wherever.part of your job is to get rid of your trash.take it back to where your offices are and dispose of it.we're already having this stuff pumped into our ground here[and i'm sure spilled on the ground]so we have enough.what part of "not near a water supply" do you people not get?is our trash produced by us residents hauled on the river?

2 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

Apr-20-13 10:57 AM

This plant will recycle usable fracking fluid (I thought you greenies were all about recycling), and will transport OUT for proper disposal what can’t be recycled, as you requested. And still you can’t get it through your thick skulls that the end result is cleaner energy, jobs, and economic growth. No worries. If you succeed in driving the gas industry away there are other places along the river that will appreciate the jobs and the growth. Enjoy all the prosperity, Warwood.

2 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

Apr-20-13 11:36 AM

From the Beaver County, PA, Times, January 24, 2013: "Studies from the U.S. Geological Survey ... found that waste from fracking can be radioactive - and in some cases, highly radioactive. A geological survey report found that millions of barrels of wastewater from unconventional wells in Pennsylvania and conventional wells in New York were 3,609 times more radioactive than the federal limit for drinking water and 300 times more radioactive than a Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit for nuclear plant discharges. And Mark Engle, the USGS research geologist who co-authored the report, said that fracking flowback from the Marcellus shale contains higher radiation levels than similar shale formations."

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

mkhunt

Apr-20-13 12:28 PM

Besides the perc found poisoning woodlands where million dollar homes were built, it is now obvious that an earth fault is there causing cracking of these McMansions..Texas is a warning in that cancer centers are cropping up like mushrooms, this is the second year that there is no water to plant the rice crop. I spoke to an energy company woman who told me her best friend had just been diagnosed with a brain tumor.I have worked for 5 years now on the contamination here and will be adding the state ethics laws to my site. Corruption is the mechanism which lets this happen and we were open for being given the Business. If we want change we must reform WV and maybe it will benefit the dying peoples of the gas exploitation states of OK and Texas.CS Lewis wrote about this type of business in Hideous Strength and the comparisons are startling.

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

mkhunt

Apr-20-13 12:33 PM

Here is a clarification: WOODLANDS, TEXAS is a high priced neighborhood inhabited by energy bosses...hold the line and don't give in to the lies! see liberty and justice wv for story of Rea, PA families...

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CleanWater

Apr-20-13 1:16 PM

Problem is, that we cannot trust the government (or wheeling water dept.) to protect us or tell us if and when the intake water becomes contaminated. EPA/DEP loves fracking (other than being unable to do squat because of Cheney loophole).

4 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

Apr-20-13 2:37 PM

You might want to check out: "Geochemical Evaluation of Flowback Brine from Marcellus Gas Wells", by Lara O. Haluszczak, and others, Dept. of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University; Accepted for publication October 2, 2012; This study assesses the composition of (fracking) flowback waters from the Marcellus shale ... . Concentrations of most inorganic components of flowback water (Chlorine, Bromine, ... Strontium, Barium, Radium, ... and others) increase with time from a well and after hydraulic stimulation. ... For total Radium (combined 226 Ra and 228 Ra) the highest level reported is 6540 pCiL." By way of comparison, the Federal limit on any type of Radium in drinking water, the allowable Maximum Contaminant Level is 5 pCi/L. The "pCiL" or "pCi/L" is "Picocuries Per Liter", and is a standard measure of the concentration of Radium and Radium decay products.

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

Apr-20-13 2:47 PM

By "Cheney Loophole", CleanWater means what is better known as the "Halliburton Loophole", a bill slipped into the Clean Water Act of 2005 at the urging of VP Dick Cheney that exempts nat gas fracking fluids from regulation under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and others. As summarized by Wiki: "It created a loophole that exempts companies drilling for natural gas from disclosing the chemicals involved in fracking operations that would normally be required under federal clean water laws. The loophole is commonly known as the "Halliburton loophole" since former Halliburton CEO Dick Cheney was reportedly instrumental in its passage".

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

Apr-20-13 4:04 PM

WVUGEO “3,609 times more radioactive than the federal limit for drinking water and 300 times more radioactive than a Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit for nuclear plant discharges.”

So don’t drink it and don’t discharge it. Duhhhh...

Are you proposing we don’t allow the industrial production of ANY liquid you can’t drink? The only thing that will satisfy the greenazis like WVUGEO, CleanWater, and mkhunt is for America to go back to the stone age.

2 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CleanWater

Apr-20-13 5:33 PM

we're a bit concerned that there will be millions of gallons of highly concentrated, soluble, radioactive waste being moved in and out of a site just upstream of a drinking water intake (on the same shore). That's stupid by design. We're worried about spills, runoff, leaks here. Since they legally don't have to disclose the chemical composition of each load, there's no way to know what's in it. We'd like to know. The government cant tell us and the industry wont. Moreover, I'd want to know where is this toxic waste going? Some other community of folks and their children? How is it being dealt with to protect humans and the environment? Sure gas is cleaner burning than coal, but as addicted to energy as we are, why suffer exposure to toxins? Study it more thoroughly. EPA/DEP going about this willy-nilly. With the glut, let's slow it down a bit, and rethink, redesign, and better innovate this extraction process and waste stream. Recycling? Vague/ambiguous. Stoneage Greennazi's? Huh?

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

Apr-20-13 5:58 PM

CleanWater, I hope nobody tells you about the millions of gallons of highly flammable, poisonous, carcinogenic, carbon-filled liquids being tanker-trucked in and pumped out daily at gasoline stations on almost every street corner, some within only feet of residences and schools. Perhaps we should rethink, redesign, and better innovate our modern motor transportation system. Go back to the Flintstones mobile. Slow it down a bit.

2 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

Apr-20-13 6:28 PM

CleanWater, you wrote: "gas is cleaner burning than coal". Maybe not. A report: "Methane and the greenhouse-gas footprint of natural gas from shale formations"; March 2011; by Cornell University professors Robert W. Howarth, Renee Santoro and Anthony Ingraffea confirmed an earlier, controversial study by Howarth and Ingraffea that the complete cycle of Shale gas extraction and use emits a lot more greenhouse gas than Coal. Methane is a far more potent heat-trapper than CO2. A quote: "We evaluate the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas obtained by high-volume hydraulic fracturing from shale formations, focusing on methane emissions. ... The higher emissions from shale gas occur at the time wells are hydraulically fractured ... . ... Compared to coal, the (greenhouse gas) footprint of shale gas is at least 20% greater and perhaps more than twice as great on the 20-year horizon and is comparable when compared over 100 years".

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CleanWater

Apr-20-13 7:11 PM

Thanks for the cite Geo. I wasn't thinking GHG though, thinking coal's NOx, SOx, Hg, PM2.5, and the remaining fly ash.

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

mikeyd

Apr-21-13 7:52 AM

and while the epa has shut down almost every other business around here.polluting is polluting.at least with the other companies we knew what the pollution was.being untruthful is the name of this game.we don't trust gas officials or our own government officials.you all dumped this stuff into the river in wellsburg using us for your lab tests.and the epa let you do it.gas officials,government officials,lawyers,used car salesmen,etc.one will lie and the other will swear to it.can't we at least have obama come here and tell us that this stuff is safe to drink?

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

billybob

Apr-21-13 8:13 AM

I think there is more here than what we are told.The aim is Wheeling citizens to pay for sewer plant upgrade and frack business to not have any cost using that Wheeling system after the upgrade. Then water plant paid by Wheeling citizens may handle dirtier water. WELL WHO PAYS IF WE CAN NOT GET THE CLEAN WATER OR CLEAN UP FRACK SEWER OUTPUT? One major spill and company will sneak away and WHO Pays?

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

Apr-21-13 8:58 AM

Fear change. Resist growth. Oppose development. Because everything’s fine just the way it is. All that wisdom and foresight is why Warwood and Wheeling and West Virginia are such bustling, thriving, healthy economic powerhouses today.

No worries. Your kids can always find jobs and a future elsewhere. Maybe they’ll visit. Not long visits, though. Too depressing after seeing what’s possible.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

SpankysLastDance

Apr-21-13 9:43 AM

"I think once people get to know GreenHunter, they will have a better view of them." Really? Knowing them and liking or disliking them on a personal level has nothing to do with the dangers of the fracking water. Sounds like politics coming into play.

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

SpankysLastDance

Apr-21-13 9:55 AM

Still waiting to hear from the Wheeling-Ohio County Health Department on this issue. "As a City-County Health Department, our agency is the official government entity with the responsibility for protecting the public's health". ***********wheelingwv.gov/uploads/02-22-12_tb_Health.pdf

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

Apr-21-13 10:15 AM

Since all the flowback water transported to the facility will be either a) recycled and then pumped more than a mile underground where it has never produced a single documented case of harm to anyone in the thousands of Ohio Valley wells where it has been used, or b) transported by barge to a disposal facility far from Wheeling, I doubt the Wheeling-Ohio County Health Department will have much interest in it.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Showing 25 of 39 comments Show More Comments
 
 

Post a Comment

You must first login before you can comment.

*Your email address:
*Password:
Remember my email address.
or
 
 

EZToUse.com

I am looking for: