Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | All Access E-Edition | Home RSS
 
 
 

Frack Water Meeting Tonight

Opponents expected to question planned recycling development

May 22, 2013

WHEELING — Residents referring to themselves as “Wheeling Water Warriors” have the chance to question GreenHunter Water officials about the company’s plans to recycle natural gas frack water in......

« Back to Article

 
 
sort: oldest | newest

Comments

(58)

idliketoknow

May-22-13 8:07 AM

Im quivering with anticipation of the s***storm of comments from WVUGEO....

2 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 9:12 AM

The questions and answers will go something like this:

Q: “When you dump all that radioactive waste into the river what will it do to our babies?”

A: “We won’t be dumping the flowback water into the river. We’ll be recycling most of it and shipping the rest out on...”

Q: [Interrupt] “So when all that toxic radioactive waste gets into my drinking water will you be paying for my medical bills?”

A: “As I said, the flowback water won’t be going into...”

Q: [Interrupt] “How dare you dump radioactive waste into my river. You’re killing children!”

A: “Sigh... All the flowback water will be shipped...”

Q: [Interrupt] “You keep your dirty radioactive waste out of my river...”

3 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

RRafael2

May-22-13 10:37 AM

Trollslayer, you *hope* that's how it goes. It won't be. You are incredibly transparent, predictable and boring. Anything anti-fracking, the knee jerk comes up. BTW, GreenHunter stock is down today, are we crying in our Cheerios? WVGEO is an intelligent, educated man who knows what he's talking about. Sorry if his science gets in the way of your profit.

2 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

idliketoknow

May-22-13 10:49 AM

"WVGEO is an intelligent, educated man who knows what he's talking about."

And I'm not? I have the same education as WVUGEO and I dare say I have more industry experience relating to this field than he does. I respectuflly disagree with just about all of his positions on natural gas exploration and exploitation.

4 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:06 AM

"If people want to talk about radioactive materials, I don't have those reports." Why not? The reports are available. And, it isn't just "radioactivity". It is what the radiation is emanating from. As in "Fate of Radium in Marcellus Flowback Water", presented by the University of Pittsburgh at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering, "Radium is ... often found in Marcellus Shale flowback water at activities exceeding 10,000 pCi/L ... (while the) EPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water is 5pCi/L". What are they going to do with the radium in the flowback? When will they get and read "those reports"? Will radiation detectors be installed at the plant and along the truck routes through the neighborhoods? How are they going to keep the radium out of the river and groundwater? Radium is incredibly hazardous. It will settle in your bones, and, by damaging your chromosomes, inflict disease and disab

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:09 AM

idliketoknow: We have the "same education"? Do we know each other; or, do you know us, who we are? We are somewhat incredulous; forgive us for being so.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 11:13 AM

WVUGEO "Radium is ... often found in Marcellus Shale flowback water at activities exceeding 10,000 pCi/L ... (while the) EPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water is 5pCi/L"

Well then for God's sake don't drink the stuff. Responsibly recycle and dispose of it. Oh wait, that's what they plan to do...

And for God's sake don't drink petroleum either. They're trucking gasoline and diesel fuel into Warwood on a near daily basis, so maybe you need a Gasoline Warriors meeting, Warwood. What if some of that deadly poisonous diesel stuff spills? Disease, disability, death, destruction, demons, dragons, doomsday...

yawn...

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

idliketoknow

May-22-13 11:18 AM

WVUGEO, you aren't the only bright geologist to come out of WVU.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 11:19 AM

RRafael2 “WVGEO is an intelligent, educated man who knows what he's talking about.”

WVUGEO claims to be an ex-geologist now living on Social Security and a convenience store owner. Not exactly what I’d call current experts in the field, but maybe slightly more informed than the children you loons had at the park waving signs you made and shilling for a cause they had no clue about.

GreenHunter stock is down today? Buy! When that advice earns you a few bucks you can thank me later.

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:20 AM

Another report that he must not have seen is one from the United States Geologic Survey: "Radium Content of Oil- and Gas-Field Produced Waters in the Northern Appalachian Basin (USA): Summary and Discussion of Data; E.L. Rowan, M.A. Engle, C.S. Kirby, and T.F. Kraemer; Scientific Investigations Report 2011–5135". Just FYI: "Produced Waters" is fracking flowback. And, oh, yeah, in our previous post, what we were cut off from saying is that radium will settle in your bones, damage your chromosomes, and thereby cause harm to your grandchildren.

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:21 AM

idliketoknow: Hope we get a chance to meet someday, swap tales. God bless.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:23 AM

RRafael2: Thanks for the kudos, below. Hope we can meet you, as well, someday.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:25 AM

Troll: A big correction: None of us "owns" a convenience store. One of us clerks there to help us keep body and soul together. Our geologist is, through medical error, disabled to the point of being very nearly housebound.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

mkhunt

May-22-13 11:26 AM

Who paid for the damage LAD did running frac water through the Wheeling water plant..the corrosive nature of the water caused very extensive damage and witnesses reported trucks dumping directly into the river during off hours. the PRICE of Justice book on coal mining is a precedent setter. We need more class action suits and we are out there trying to form them.Big flare at Kelley Pad causing big amount of activity in Wetzel County..what was burning to produce those smells!!!Do not give in, fight to win!

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 11:39 AM

WVUGEO “A big correction: None of us "owns" a convenience store. One of us clerks there”

Sorry for the “big” error, GEO. Because convenience store “clerk” gives one so much more expertise in industrial waste treatment and disposal than convenience store “owner.”

I clerked at a convenience store one summer. But that was when I was much younger and needed a little cash to buy textbooks and pizza, and I don’t remember learning any geology there. Maybe I missed it...

2 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 11:44 AM

mkhunt “Who paid for the damage LAD did running frac water through the Wheeling water plant..the corrosive nature of the water caused very extensive damage and witnesses reported trucks dumping directly into the river during off hours.”

So you’re saying that dumping fracking flowback directly into the river damaged the Wheeling sewage treatment plant? That fracking water is more powerful than I thought.

And you’re saying the EPA and law enforcement didn’t do their job in prosecuting those lawbreakers? Leave it to the Government to fall down on the job...

3 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:45 AM

Another report someone should get this guy a copy of is "Analysis of Marcellus Flowback Finds High Levels of Ancient Brines"; Lara O. Haluszczak, et. al.; Department of Geosciences, Penn State University. It was announced in December of last year and is scheduled for publication in the journal, Applied Geochemistry. In sum, the "study indicates that the brine flowback elements found in high levels in the late stages of hydraulic fracturing come from the ancient brines ... (and) water that flows back from gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region after hydraulic fracturing is many times more salty than seawater, with high contents of various elements, including radium".

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 11:49 AM

Troll, you're lapsing into snide, inappropriate, and wildly inaccurate personal insult and innuendo. It ill becomes the erudition your otherwise skilled use of the language suggests. Sorry we're goring your pet ox.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 12:14 PM

WVUGEO, whose pet ox? You’re the one babbling irrelevant figures like comparing the highest ever found radium concentration in one sample to drinking water, and babbling death and destruction but unable to come up with a single example of damage done here after THOUSANDS of locally drilled and fracked wells. Maybe it has something to do with your ongoing campaigns to promote coal to liquid fuel (never mind any environmental damage from coal mining) and CO2 to gas (while at the same time warning of the dangers of gas lines which someday would be used to transport your own gas). Don’t need the cheaper competition, eh?

Snide? You mean snide like “Sorry we're goring your pet ox”? LOL

2 Agrees | 3 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 12:45 PM

Another article which you won't be able to discuss at tonight's meeting is "Radiation in Fracking Fluid is a New Concern"; Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; March 1, 2011, by Don Hopey and Daniel Malloy. It also cites another article, in the New York Times, which "reported ... that 116 of 179 Marcellus wells in Pennsylvania had high levels of radiation in wastewater samples and that wastewater discharges into rivers and streams were untested for radiation even though government agencies and the industry knew of the risks".

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 1:00 PM

Wow. Rock-solid sources like Pittsburgh Post-Gazette AND the New York Times reported “high levels”. Perhaps so high they’re inexpressible. Or perhaps “high” is a newspaper’s clever way of boosting sales on a slow news day. Hard to tell without a number.

Still, how articles about untested wastewater dumped into the river relate to a plant that WILL NOT BE DUMPING WASTE WATER INTO THE RIVER eludes me.

3 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 1:03 PM

Choker, we’re just very confident that your EPA will keep us all safe. Otherwise why are we paying for so much harassment from them?

By the way, I saw a gasoline truck drive by your house this morning. Do you know there's enough chemical energy in one gasoline truck to destroy the entire town of Warwood? Better get some kids out at the park with some signs...

3 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

WVUGEO

May-22-13 1:12 PM

Troll: With apologies to all others who might not be interested in this somewhat off-topic aside, since you mentioned "CO2 to gas" in your post below, the US Navy was just awarded, just two weeks ago: "United States Patent 8,436,457 - Synthesis of Hydrocarbons Via Catalytic Reduction of CO2; Date: May 7, 2013; Assignee: The United States of America, as represented by the Secretary of the Navy". They and their contractors have technologies in the books, as well, which enable the use of environmental energy to drive the process of converting Carbon Dioxide into all sorts of liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 1:12 PM

Oh, and Choker, there’s already some radium in your water. And some chemicals in your food. And businessmen built your house. And auto accidents happen regularly on your street. Close the shutters, bar the door, and have a nice day.

3 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TrollSlayer

May-22-13 1:15 PM

GEO, I hope you don’t plan to transport any of that gas by pipeline. Because just the other day you were posting about the dangerous “pipeline problem.” Maybe you could truck it... No, no trucks full of potentially dangerous fluids will be going through your town. Maybe by barge? Yikes! LOL

3 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Showing 25 of 58 comments Show More Comments
 
 

Post a Comment

You must first login before you can comment.

*Your email address:
*Password:
Remember my email address.
or
 
 

EZToUse.com

I am looking for: