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Monitor Plant Radioactivity

August 14, 2013

Controversy over a company’s plan to handle wastewater from gas and oil wells at a facility in Warwood appears to be over in a way, but just beginning in another....

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(26)

TrollSlayer

Aug-15-13 11:10 PM

mkhunt, so you can catch tuberculosis from sand? Really.

Just one example of the ridiculous disinformation being spread by these anti-gas loons.

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mkhunt

Aug-15-13 10:41 PM

From the chemical origination sites in Texas and that includes coated sand which is handled in the open with no protection for the workers(tuberculosis, cancer and other breathing disorders begin here) to the shipping and storage of the same, to the sites where the toxic chemicals cause harm, workers are burned and crushed, local environmental impacts are severe and the flaring poisons all for miles around..we get to the waste water!!!!A BAD BUSINESS...corruption is the name of this game.

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TrollSlayer

Aug-15-13 11:51 AM

RRafael2 “I personally toured the GreenHunter New Matamoras facility. While there, I noted that only ONE of several employees engaged in truck intake was wearing the radiation monitor. When I asked about it, there was a flurry of activity, and then they all had their monitors on. This tells me that their concern about radiation is only when someone is watching.”

This tells me those who were actually working with the flowback fluid knew there was no radiation danger from it. Do you think they decided not to wear their badges because they didn’t want proof they were being exposed to radiation? LOL

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TrollSlayer

Aug-15-13 11:46 AM

RRafael2 is right for once. Closely monitor the radiation levels at the GreenHunter facility, and make the findings public. That approach is far more effective at keeping citizens safe than fearmongering and disinformation by babbling irrelevant factoids about radiation levels found elsewhere, or radiation standards that don’t apply to this facility, or harm done by radiation that is unrelated to the materials they intend to process here.

Unless your goal was never public safety in the first place. Because if your goal was just keeping industry out of business at this industrial-zoned site, or shutting down the gas industry in this area, then the disinformation and fearmongering campaigns were definitely the right strategy.

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daWraith

Aug-15-13 11:15 AM

1derY, if YOU believe in Science you cannot possibly accept Global Warming as fact.

What was it , 48 in Wheeling this morning.

On A U G U S T 15???

BBBWhAHAHAHAHAAH!

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RRafael2

Aug-15-13 10:12 AM

I am pleased that our usually conservative newspaper is recognizing the REAL dangers of fracking wastewater. Kudos to them for their educated opinion here today. FACT: I personally toured the GreenHunter New Matamoras facility. While there, I noted that only ONE of several employees engaged in truck intake was wearing the radiation monitor. When I asked about it, there was a flurry of activity, and then they all had their monitors on. This tells me that their concern about radiation is only when someone is watching. Also, while there, they permitted one truck to come through during the hour while the Wheeling government officials were there. The minute they left, a convoy of 6 trucks barreled into the facility. The resident who lives across the street told us, "Listen to everything they say, and then realize that everything they say is lies." I'll believe my own eyes, and a resident with no money at stake, before I believe GreenHunter or its lackeys.

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TrollSlayer

Aug-15-13 6:23 AM

wonderwhy "Toolboy- You sit on here and call names"

You mean names like "toolboy"? Got hypocrisy? LOL

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 8:59 PM

WVUGEO, again with our apologies for repetition, STILL waiting for a single example of harm... yawn... repeat yawn...

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mikeyd

Aug-14-13 8:51 PM

radon gas is in just about every building[mostly the basement areas] in this area including schools.buy one of those kits and put it in your basement and you'll see.this area is right in the middle of the highest amounts of radon in the country[according to the epa website].we breathe it every day.one reason for the high cancer levels here.

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WVUGEO

Aug-14-13 8:49 PM

Again with our apologies for repetition: In the report/presentation: "Fate of Radium in Marcellus Shale Flowback Water", which can be found via AOL web search of that title, University of Pittsburgh scientists Tieyuan Zhang, Daniel Bain and Radisav Vidic, disclose, that, in a project funded by the US Department of Energy, they measured "Radium 226" in Marcellus flowback ranging from hundreds to thousands of picoCuries per Liter, "pCi/L". They further confirm, that: "EPA limits for Ra-226 in drinking water is 5 pCi/L".

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WVUGEO

Aug-14-13 8:47 PM

With apologies to all but Troll, we feel obliged to repeat info we appended to another article: In US Geological Survey Report 2011-5135: "Radium Content of Oil- and Gas-Field Produced Waters in the Northern Appalachian Basin (USA): Summary and Discussion of Data; US Geologic Survey, 2011; The range of radium activities for samples from the Marcellus Shale (can be as much as) 18,000 picocuries per liter (pCi/L)". And, as can be learned from the EPA's "Radionuclides in Drinking Water Rule", the EPA's "current standards (for drinking water) are: combined radium 226/228 of 5 pCi/L".

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wonderwhy

Aug-14-13 7:24 PM

Toolboy- You sit on here and call names and insult all day. You don't believe in science, that is clear. Nor do you think a corporation would cover up a potential risk.......wonderwhere Erin Brocavich is these days???????

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 5:02 PM

You just can't make that stuff up, folks. LOL

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 5:02 PM

wvhoopie, in this SAME thread "They won't stop until they poison the entire OV."

Yeah, you too, hoopie. LOL

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wvhoopie

Aug-14-13 4:01 PM

Troll's constant negativism is funny!

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 2:41 PM

GEO, you're consistently pushing coal, and consistently disparaging gas. Coal, which releases extremely poisonous mercury, lead, arsenic, RADIOACTIVE RADIUM, RADIOACTIVE RADON, RADIOACTIVE URANIUM,... yet not a peep from you about those poisons. In fact, you advocate adding RADIOACTIVE fly ash from coal to concrete, exposing people to those hazards every time they walk or drive over streets and sidewalks.

Now tell us again just who is "blowing off or attempting to justify the danger with willful, unwarranted preference for some unspecified profit"...

Keep pushing that coal-to-snake oil and fearmongering that gas, GEO. You just might convince a Congressman to throw a few million taxpayer bucks your way... LOL

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 2:31 PM

WVUGEO, sounds serious. Can you please cite ONE documented case of radium poisoning from fracking fluid ANYWHERE? EVER? Considering they've been fracking wells for DECADES, WORLDWIDE, and considering how high you claim the risk to be, and how serious you claim the consequences, I'm truly surprised you can't produce a SINGLE documented example of harm from radium in fracking flowback.

No, the "radium girls" were not injured by fracking fluid. Unless you think someone will be drinking the equivalent of about 100 full truckloads of fracking fluid every hour for a year.

STILL waiting for you to come through with a relevant argument...

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WVUGEO

Aug-14-13 12:34 PM

The radiation itself has been measured to be anywhere from 10 to more than 80 times permissible levels at landfills. And, it is not just the radiation, but what the radiation emanates from: Radium. If radium escapes containment and gets into your groundwater, into your drinking water, then it will start to bio-accumulate by displacing calcium. Further: If the dump is not covered, then the risk of radium-contaminated dust becoming airborne must be considered, and has been considered by some willing to actually willing to devote a little thought to the subject. Particles of radium-containing dust lodged in your lungs will do the same things to them it will do to your bones; and, it will affect your genetic material in the same way. To blow off or attempt justifying the danger is willful, unwarranted preference for some unspecified profit over the safety and health of people with no stake in any of this and of children yet even to be conceived. It is vile.

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DigDoug

Aug-14-13 12:06 PM

Landfill alarms are set to detect very, very low levels of radioactivity, for obvious reasons. Where fracking waste was involved in PA, most of these alarms were "false" readings, and I know of NO dumping violations at landfills in PA. As for spills of frack water or let's call it "Brine", it is just washed off the road. No big deal. They don't dig it up because it's radioactive. Just doesn't happen that way.

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WVUGEO

Aug-14-13 10:46 AM

Troll: Your inane, adversarial banter distracts from real issues that could be of critical import to the citizens of the Wheeling area, indeed, to anyone downstream of the frack treatment plant whose drinking water is drawn from the river. The author of this piece is doing the readers a grave disservice by not identifying the basic, and impeccably credible, sources of information concerning the radium content, and consequent hazards, of frack flowback. Further, your blind service to the fracking industry totally ignores the hazards of accident. Should frack waste contaminated with radium in the amounts measured in some cases by the USGS and others somehow get spilled in one of the neighborhoods through which it must pass, the ground into which it seeped would have to, by rights, be excavated and hauled away to a licensed disposal facility. Keep in mind that solid frack wastes have set off landfill/dump radiation alarms in OH and PA more than 1,000 times in recent years.

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 10:27 AM

GEO, flowback is not drinking water. Nobody will be drinking it. Your comparison to drinking water standards is dishonest.

GEO, the flowback water brought to the GreenHunter facility will not be dumped into the river. It will be recycled or sent to deep disposal wells. Your comparison to industrial effluent standards is dishonest.

GEO, your fearmongering by relating the dangers of ingestion of radium is irrelevant, since nobody will be ingesting fracking flowback. Your irrelevant fearmongering is dishonest.

Is disinformation and fearmongering REALLY all the evidence against the gas drilling industry you have? Really? NOTHING relevant? That’s truly pathetic. Get out there and find some real documented harm. Some relevant hazards. Because your obvious disinformation campaign only reveals how little REAL argument you have.

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DigDoug

Aug-14-13 10:25 AM

From what I've read, the WVDEP and USNRC have not found high levels of radioactivity. If they had the EPA would be writing violations. However, remember that you are exposed to radon everyday in low-levels from the coal, especially the mined-out areas, which naturally seep to the surface. Read your Wheeling Water Report. Yes, radon is in your drinking water. According to the American Cancer Society, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer.

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WVUGEO

Aug-14-13 8:59 AM

At least this op-ed brings the subject up; but, it falls far short in specifying the bases of concern. The United States Geologic Survey, the Pennsylvania State University and the University of Pittsburgh, among others, have all identified and confirmed the presence of Radium in shale gas frack flowback in alarmingly high amounts; amounts that are thousands of times higher than that allowed in drinking water and hundreds of times higher than that allowed in industrial effluent. Radium is an horrific toxin: It will, if ingested even in tiny amounts over time, accumulate in your bones and cause damage to genetic material that will manifest as disease and disability in your grandchildren. It will, eventually, cause cancers of the bone and blood in you. This op-ed is a welcome mention of the topic which has for too long been suppressed, but it falls far short of outlining the true extent of the danger, of acknowledging the extent of the evidence that exists of that danger.

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TrollSlayer

Aug-14-13 7:23 AM

...said the union tool who spent his miserable life supporting unions representing workers who extracted coal, burned coal, and transported coal on trucks and barges. And that was back when coal was dirty. What goes around comes around, hoopie.

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wvhoopie

Aug-14-13 6:58 AM

They won't stop until they poison the entire OV.

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