Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | All Access E-Edition | Home RSS
 
 
 

Report: 73 Percent Of W.Va. Third Graders Deficient in Reading

October 2, 2013

CHARLESTON (AP) — More than seven in 10 West Virginia children can’t read proficiently by the end of third grade, and West Virginia Kids Count said Tuesday the odds are slim they’ll ever catch up....

« Back to Article

 
 
sort: oldest | newest

Comments

(24)

UNCOMMONSENSE

Oct-03-13 8:30 PM

They learn to cover themselves in tatoos and pierce themselves like jungle savages

They learn to talk like southern California "valley girls" and don't pronounce "T" in any words so they sound like bros frum da hood!!

They learn they should wear tobogans when it's 95 degrees outside regardless how stupid they look!

They learn to wear their pants down to reveal their underwear just like prisoners do to advertise they are seeking sodomy

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

UNCOMMONSENSE

Oct-03-13 8:21 PM

I think by now EVERYBODY has seen recent public school grads that can't do simple math, read, or understand ANYTHING about the constitution!

But thanks to the brainwashing they received, they are all experts on gay rights, global warming, gun control, evolution, the Quran, and the evils that christians and the founding fathers did!!

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

dyingov

Oct-03-13 7:09 AM

wheeldog, I can agree! The question is do the "parents" that were educated in the "system" have the skills?

"Scientific studies" by who/whom and where did the funding come from?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Wheeldog

Oct-03-13 12:00 AM

old, dying, et al; please read my first post again. Scientific studies have shown that the most important time in a child's development largely takes place prior to entering the first grade and has pervasive influence throughout the life of the student/person. The family setting of a child is a critical determiner as to how he/she succeeds in school and later life. Yes, some kids can and do overcome a lack of family support, but all-too-many other fall by the wayside. Good teachers are important, but they can only do so much with what they are given.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TheRealityPolice

Oct-02-13 6:19 PM

Whoops, a typo - not "NEW" - should be NEA - teacher unions.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

TheRealityPolice

Oct-02-13 6:17 PM

Let's see: We have removed the literature from schools that families and children used in the 1800s, such as McGuffey readers, and the like. WHY? Think back to the style and verbage used by our citizens during say, the Civil War - the eloquent letters that were sent back and forth between soldiers and wives, that have been preserved and are available in most historical centers. WHAT HAPPENED? One answer: Control of education by the Government. Another answer: Teacher Unions. How have these two overbloated, corrupted, morally bankrupt entities helped public education? Give me ONE EXAMPLE. Oh, maybe free breakfast and lunches for poor kids; of course those are full of fatty, nutritionally deficient, GMO-laden crap which have - SHOCKER! - made kids FAT. Academically, and morally, the Govt sponsored crap and NEW have failed our kids miserably. Get rid of them both - they stink.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

dyingov

Oct-02-13 6:12 PM

wheeldog sayz, "Do parents read to their children and provide them the encouragement and guidance to gain fundamental reading skills? Sending children to school does not end parental responsibility for the education of their offspring."

If the parents do not have the "fundamental" skills, we have a never ending problem....

Atoddh, WV spends more than half of the state budget on public schools. Nepotism in the school system is the norm....

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

oldsteelmaker

Oct-02-13 2:15 PM

Dawg, it's been tried. RIF (reading is fundamental), Head Start, No Child Left Behind, and a hundred smaller programs.

Studies show by fifth grade none of these have any real benefit. I wish it did. Educators are part of the problem, parents are too. Washington and Charleston and all the layers upon layers of bureaucrats that love imposing rules are another big chunk of it. Amazing thing, my public high school had maybe a dozen admin employees, with no computers, and 40% of a class of 300 went to college. Now, with roughly the same class size, they have computers everywhere and three dozen admin people. And the same 40% going to higher education. And even with all the high tech labor saving benefits to teachers, cost is up by a factor of 20!

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

oldsteelmaker

Oct-02-13 2:05 PM

Rich, until you change the system to get rid of both the mediocre to bad teachers, and the administrators and the unions that keep them in place, your proposal won't do any good.

Money is NOT the answer. Detroit spends a huge amount per child, and has a terrible literacy rate. Case in point, the Valedictorian (that's first in her class, wonder)of a Detroit high school almost flunked out her freshman year in a state college, because she had about a sixth grade level of knowledge. Had to take remedial everything.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

VincentVega

Oct-02-13 1:27 PM

SIXTY ONE percent ignored!

In Marshall County alone, Teachers have allowed 61 percent of third graders to lack reading proficiency. "Educators" try to escape responsibility by blaming parents. We have in Marshall County been paying teachers to educate our children since 1846. Quite enough time to teach more than 39 percent of the children to read!

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

richardwhee

Oct-02-13 1:15 PM

Maybe by advertising how many fail it will justify hiring more teachers/administrators at higher rates. Appears to me that the Admin Personnel likr their pictures on TV/Newspapers Some always have something to say.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Wheeldog

Oct-02-13 12:59 PM

"We should be focusing on the early years, from birth through age three, when the building blocks of literacy are being laid and where we can get the highest possible return on our investment," Hale said.

The above excerpt says it all. The critical foundation for learning is established long before any child enters elementary school. Do parents read to their children and provide them the encouragement and guidance to gain fundamental reading skills? Sending children to school does not end parental responsibility for the education of their offspring. When the early elementary kids come home do the parents show an interest in their classroom experiences and encourage/assist them in homework and assignments? Do the mothers and fathers attend parent-teacher conferences and occasionally inquire of teachers about the progress of their children? Do they encourage their children to have a positive attitude toward education?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

oldsteelmaker

Oct-02-13 12:57 PM

I wonder if these statistics include the private school kids, particularly the parochial schools. Considering those have much stricter attitudes about basic skills, I wonder what the numbers would be for only public schools.

If this is only public schools, what are the private school ratings? Mr. Newspaper 'Splainer, please find out.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

atoddh

Oct-02-13 12:54 PM

dying: You do see WV is spending a fortune on public education with negative results. The concept of rewarding failure is rampant in WV and one reason the State is failing.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

wvhoopie2

Oct-02-13 11:45 AM

Just shows that you can throw money at a problems and still not get results. Go back to the basic skills of reading such as the old reading circle and you will get better results than all the new programs put together. Plus you will be able to save a lot of money spent on consultants, extra teachers, and wasteful programs. Low tech sometimes works better than high tech.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

dyingov

Oct-02-13 9:49 AM

Title 1 funding act of 1965, "Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged" (reading program) Now go to a Marshall County Board meeting and ask them how many positions are funded by the federal title 1 program.

Could we finally say the program is a waste of tax payer dollars?

In June the title 1 funds paid for some teachers to attend a workshop in Las Vegas....I guess they are still trying to figure out how learners learn.....

Vincy, I doubt that the property tax payers would consider that education is FREE!

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

VincentVega

Oct-02-13 8:08 AM

Outrageous!

Marshall County began providing free education in 1846, ONE HUNDRED & SIXTY SEVEN years later, 39 percent of third graders struggle to read?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Triton

Oct-02-13 8:04 AM

Reports like this are like the endless/contradictory warnings about coffee or wine, or eggs, etc. Its bad its good next week. One group (usally teacher based) will say that kids are on or above some level, some other group (grant funded and needing to justify existance) will skew up some more stats that show that kids cannot read. Such school stats are always wacked out by the kids and families who are in school only because the law requires it and they are "0" stats, or the kids who are in high school by juvenile court order. So we really don't know what these reports mean and people tend to ignore them. The reports are too often from special interest groups with a hidden agenda. The true motivation for issuing the report is about wages or getting more grants to fester on for another three years. Don't know if Johnny can read, don't know if I can make him, but I made mine and they succeeded cuz we let them know it was important. No stat for that.

2 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

VincentVega

Oct-02-13 7:59 AM

Outrageous!

Marshall County began providing free education in 1846. ONE HUNRED & SIXTY SEVEN years later, 50 percent of third graders struggle to read?i

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Highland

Oct-02-13 7:38 AM

Thanks to the bloated educational bureaucracy in Charleston - and the various RESAs - for nothing.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

daWraith

Oct-02-13 5:44 AM

Liberal-think has had control of the educational system in the USA for 40 years now.

Unionized teachers reward mediocrity and discourage individual accomplishment.

Just what Obama ordered, a uneducated populace who can be told that plant food can make the earth warmer and man is the cause or that the debt went up almost $7 Trillion dollars in 56 months but Opie cut the deficit by 50% and IDIOTS believe it.

4 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

atoddh

Oct-02-13 12:48 AM

NR folks: Do you pay reporters and others who do not produce? If you did you would never get the paper out every day(which is remarkable to do btw).

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

atoddh

Oct-02-13 12:46 AM

Students learn or pay cuts for staff and bosses. WV is rewarding poor performance by the people in charge of the schools. Why?

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

atoddh

Oct-02-13 12:44 AM

Where are all the high paid school executives in all of this. This is their job. Their pay should be tied to student performance.EG Ms. Vargo et al.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Showing 24 of 24 comments
 
 

Post a Comment

You must first login before you can comment.

*Your email address:
*Password:
Remember my email address.
or
 
 
 

EZToUse.com

I am looking for: