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Coast Guard Wants To Allow Frack Waste

Environmentalists horrified, but service says barge transport is safer and can reduce pollution

December 16, 2013

PITTSBURGH — The U.S. Coast Guard wants to allow barges filled with fracking wastewater to ply the nation’s rivers on their way toward disposal....

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Gooseman

Dec-20-13 10:18 PM

EDCs, which have the ability to interfere with normal hormone action, have been linked to a number of health issues. Last year, the World Health Organization issued a report highlighting the health risks associated with the chemicals, including cancer, infertility and impaired neural and immune function. Previous studies have also suggested that EDCs may have adverse effects on the reproductive system in both women and men.

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Gooseman

Dec-20-13 10:17 PM

Hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to cancer, infertility and a slew of other health problems have been found in water samples collected at and near hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," sites in Colorado, according to a new study published in the journal Endocrinology this week.

Researchers say they found elevated levels of these chemicals -- known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) -- in surface water and groundwater samples collected in the state's Garfield County, a fracking hotspot with more than 10,000 natural gas wells.

Water samples taken from the Colorado River, a drainage basin for the region, were also found to have significantly higher-than-normal levels of EDCs, the researchers said.

EDCs, which have the ability to interfere with normal hormone action, have been linked to a number of health issues. Last year, the World Health Organization issued a report highlighting the health risks associated with the chemicals, including cancer, infertility and impai

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TrollSlayer

Dec-17-13 10:36 AM

acousticportal "The Ohio River is cleaner than it has been in decades"

Amazing, considering the volume of anti-fracking death and destruction babble flowing lately. How is this possible? Maybe babble evaporates before it gets to the river...

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acousticportal

Dec-17-13 9:18 AM

The Ohio River is cleaner than it has been in decades...before gas & oil started dumping. Take a look at what happens in the back of the staging area out route 40 near Valley Grove...right before Hawks.

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atoddh

Dec-17-13 1:18 AM

Another signal that the Feds are-correctly- very pro gas development. Gas is the answer to many USA problems; including balance of payments and energy independence.

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1whoworks

Dec-16-13 9:17 PM

Why shouldn't it be transported on the river? Much much much more hazardous substances are on the river all of the time. The hypocrisy is crazy.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 9:16 PM

Sorry, I got way off topic, but stupidity should be combatted for it's own sake.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 9:15 PM

Tesla was a brilliant man. Heaven knows what he could accomplish with the current technology, but science has taken huge strides since, so don't get hung up that his ideas were suppressed. Mostly they are obsolete.

The broadcast power thing? Might work. Want to give up radio, TV, cell phones and any microwave data links to have it? No satellite stuff. Too much interference from the power transmission. Not to mention most of the power would be wasted. Go by KDKA, and see how much power you can extract from their signal parked on the street. If you get real close you may be able to light a CFL.

No conspiracy. Just like the 100 MPG carburetor. If GM could use that to get the EPA of their backs, it would be on cars tomorrow.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 9:06 PM

Richardson, "Nikola Tesla was murdered because they did not want his technology and inventions to come to fruition..."

Really?

I assume you must be one of the few people reading this on your coal-oil operated CRT, under the DC-powered bamboo filament light bulb.

Tesla was the originator of alternating current power system theory. The same system still in use today. Ever hear an electrician talking about three phase power? The engineering backbone of the Grid? Tesla.

Yes, they sure prevented his ideas from coming to fruition.

NOT!

As for that turbine everyone brings up on the net, it's a cute idea and easy to make. So easy, in fact, if it was so great, you would think anyone with a machine shop would be making their own power.

For a hundred years ago it was good engineering. We have learned a few things in the last century.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 8:56 PM

Karma was not kind to Smith. He ended up with Ross Perot on the GM board. Cost a fortune to buy back his stock and get rid of him. Ruined Smith's career. Well, that and the fact every major decision he made was wrong. A major cause of the GM bankruptcy was the billions Smith wasted on bad choices.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 8:55 PM

Richardson, I worked in the auto industry for decades. What killed the electric car was a GM CEO, Roger Smith, who saw cars as a dinosaur way to make money. He took billions of GM's assets and bought what he saw as the future, computer companies, aviation and high tech. In every case he made horrible investments that blew up in his face.

Why did this kill the electric car? He hated car guys, like Roger Stempel, the GM president and godfather of the EV-1. Smith pushed Stempel out, and killed all his R&D programs.

No huge conspiracy. Just a boss convinced everyone that didn't see things the way he did was an idiot and an enemy.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 8:45 PM

The chemicals in frack water are basically the same stuff you put in swimming pools, for the same end goal. You don't want bugs growing in the well to plug it up. The other main ingredient is sand, to keep the cracks open. As for all the "radioactive" and "toxic" stuff down there, it's MUD!!! Eroded rock, mostly granite and other igneous rock. Yes, there are radioisotopes in there, barely enough to make a Geiger counter click. Would you be worried you would ruin the film in a camera by setting it on a concrete bench????

Get real, idiots.

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 8:40 PM

Geo Metro, I looked at a few of these patents, and found one very interesting requirement to make them work. You mix the CO2 with a magical ingredient to make it work. It's called HYDROGEN. In fact, what all these so-called miracle patents do is burning in reverse. There's only one problem with that, it's called thermodynamics. You can't win, you can't break even and you can't get out of the game.

Hydrogen gas is not available as a raw material, you make it by splitting up water to hydrogen and oxygen. That takes electricity, lots of it for commercial processes. So you have to make electricity to make the hydrogen, electricity to heat and compress the gases, and electricity to separate the CO2 from the other gases. Wouldn't it be simpler to just make the electricity and sell it?

Bogus!!!

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oldsteelmaker

Dec-16-13 8:33 PM

GEO Metro, Do you know what shale is? It's fossilized MUD. Where did all that horrible radium come from? Rocks. The same rocks you would sit on if you see a granite bench. Are you afraid to sit on a granite bench? By your logic you should be. It also contains radium. Not enough to light up a watch dial, but some. About as much as the amount of intellect you have rattling around in that skull of yours.

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richardwhee

Dec-16-13 7:35 PM

WVU- Granted- The President does not make laws, but As Commmanrer In Chief he /she has the authority to order the military to do his bidding. There is also such a thing as Pres. Direciive or order.

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atoddh

Dec-16-13 3:02 PM

Barges are superior and safer than rail or highways.

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walksabout

Dec-16-13 1:29 PM

can money really be worth all this ? Odd, those most likely to suffer possible injury are hardly ever those getting the money out of the performance.

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walksabout

Dec-16-13 1:27 PM

barges leak. they do. yes they do leak.

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richardwhee

Dec-16-13 11:13 AM

Let's see- The Comm.In Chief of the Coast Guard is???? You guessed it-Obama. Need I say more?

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WVUGEO

Dec-16-13 11:04 AM

To repeat a comment we made far below: "Did we miss it? Where, exactly, is the Coast Guard quoted as saying THEY WANT to allow frack waste to be shipped on the river?" Seriously, where is that demonstrated?

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WVUGEO

Dec-16-13 10:53 AM

Richardson, in "you're not being presented with all the options", when it comes to energy, is absolutely correct. Aside from the examples he mentions, although WVU has lately refined the art, it's been known for half a century that Coal, in combination with certain Carbon-recycling wastes, even sewage sludge, can be converted into liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Moreover, the 1912, yes 1912, Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to Paul Sabatier, of France, who demonstrated that substitute natural gas Methane could be synthesized from Carbon Dioxide.

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Richardson

Dec-16-13 9:48 AM

WVUGEO of course you're not being presented with all the options. Energy has been controlled by a handful of super wealthy elitists for hundreds of years. Nikola Tesla was murdered because they did not want his technology and inventions to come to fruition. Also watch the documentary "Who Killed the Electric Car?".

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WVUGEO

Dec-16-13 9:29 AM

acousticalportal: Under a couple of Federal laws, the Coast Guard is charged with some aspects of environmental protection. It is considered a facet of national security.

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acousticportal

Dec-16-13 9:23 AM

Please tell...what interest does the Coast Guard have in this? Potential emergency deployments? I don't get it.

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TrollSlayer

Dec-16-13 9:20 AM

Richardson, if they’re trying to limit the supply why are they putting in so many wells and pipelines to get it out? Riddle me that one, joker. LOL

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