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GreenHunter Could Store Toxic Water Next to River

Concern Grows Following Spill In Kanawha

January 19, 2014

WHEELING — When GreenHunter Water opens its planned frack water recycling facility in Warwood later this year, up to 23,000 barrels of possibly contaminated and toxic water and related materials wil......

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Ragnar

Jan-19-14 12:14 AM

Did you loonies complain when the steel, coke, chemical and manufacturing plants lined the river and spewed smoke and dumped chemicals into the water?

How did people survive into their 80s back in the day?

Don't railroad cars sometimes carry hazardous chemicals a few yards from the river?

Sheep.

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atoddh

Jan-19-14 1:31 AM

folks: keep in mind the Wheeling facility is new and state of the art per the article. The Charleston facility was over 50 years old and visibly falling apart. There is a difference.

The legislation is a good thing to come out of the episode.

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Mentallywrong

Jan-19-14 1:39 AM

So, have we not learned anything from what just happened...?

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Jada60

Jan-19-14 4:57 AM

It's only water, people. Your kidneys will get rid of any waste that spills into the water. No need to worry.

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dyingov

Jan-19-14 5:54 AM

2007: CHARLESTON (AP) _ PPG Industries’ chlorine plant in Marshall County can discharge more than 10 times the mercury it currently emits under a new permit approved by state regulators.

The permit raises the cap on average monthly mercury discharges from the Natrium plant’s main outlet from 12 parts per trillion to 143 parts per trillion, PPG said.

It also gives PPG mixing zones for two pipes that discharge mercury. That allows the plant to meet water quality limits farther downstream instead of at the end of its outlet pipes.

The Department of Environmental Protection approved the permit on Aug. 1 and PPG announced it last week.

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dyingov

Jan-19-14 5:56 AM

2010: In July 2005, the WVDEP issued PPG a permit for the Natrium Plant to discharge pollutants into the Ohio River from various outlets associated with the plant. The permit limits the amount of pollutants - including mercury, iron, copper, chlorine, sulfides and aluminum - that can be discharged into the waterway.

The WVDEP claims in the suit "discharge monitoring reports" submitted by PPG since July 2006 revealed that on "multiple occasions" discharges from the Natrium Plant exceeded the maximum daily and average monthly permit limitations for "some or all" of the pollutants.

The WVDEP claims the violations continued through 2008 and 2009.

Court documents show that from September 2006 to October 2009, PPG exceeded chemical discharge limits 53 times.

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dyingov

Jan-19-14 5:58 AM

2011: CHARLESTON (AP) - PPG Industries is trying to get around new water quality regulations that would cut the amount of toxic mercury its Northern Panhandle plant discharges into the Ohio River by 90 percent.

The Pittsburgh-based company wants the eight-state Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission to grant a water-permit variance to allow "mixing zones" that are set to be eliminated in 2013.

Mixing zones are downstream areas where water quality limits don't apply and pollution discharges can be diluted so they can meet regulatory standards. PPG's request to the commission says the company believes it cannot achieve the permit limits for mercury without them.

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dyingov

Jan-19-14 6:00 AM

2013: MOUNDSVILLE (AP) - West Virginia environmental regulators are seeking nearly $250,000 in new water pollution fines against the owner of a Northern Panhandle chemical plant under revisions to a settlement reached more than two years ago.

The Department of Environmental Protection says the former PPG Industries plant in Natrium has made good progress since the parties reached a corrective-action plan in 2010, but the plant has struggled to consistently meet the mandatory pollution limits for various chemicals.

The plant manufactures chlorine, caustic soda, muriatic acid and calcium hypochlorite. It was sold in January as part of a $2.5 billion deal Pittsburgh-based PPG made with Georgia Gulf.

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dyingov

Jan-19-14 6:08 AM

2013: The commission, often called ORSANCO, is warning the sites, which are in Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio and West Virginia, that effluent monitoring indicates they may have a problem meeting the tougher mercury standard.

The resulting regulatory crunch created with the tougher standard could force the commission to delay or alter enforcement. That could mean more mercury in a river already so tainted that it carries health warnings for eating its fish because of dangerous mercury levels.

"This shouldn't have occurred in the first place," said Tim Joice, water policy program director at Kentucky Waterways Alliance. The group that tracks water quality issues in Kentucky. "From our perspective, ORSANCO should not be granting variances, and they should be enforcing what they put on the books 10 years ago."

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Marcellus

Jan-19-14 6:59 AM

Amplifications: 1) The president of ORSANCO is a high-profile Pittsburgh pro-fracking attorney, Ken Komoroski. 2) For more on the Freedom Industries bankruptcy twist Google MSNBC’s Chris Hayes video from the 17th: "Truth behind WV spill company’s bankruptcy." 3) The Freedom spill chemical 'methylcyclohexane' is used in frac fluid, see page 25 of the Congressional report from 4-18-11 "Chemicals Used in Hydraulic Fracturing."

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WVUGEO

Jan-19-14 7:15 AM

"Locally, the fracking wastewater ... could contain chemicals such as ... radium, among others, some of which produce low levels of radioactivity." Again, they are doing their level best to weasel away from telling it like it is. The "radium" is, flat out, radioactive. And, as clearly stated by the US Department of the Interior/US Geologic Survey in their 2011: Scientific Investigations Report 2011–5135, "Radium Content of Oil- and Gas-Field Produced Waters in the Northern Appalachian Basin (USA)"; frack flowback from the Marcellus can contain Radium in amounts thousands of times higher than allowed by law in drinking water and hundreds of times higher than allowed by law in industrial effluent. Even in amounts below permissible levels, if ingested, radium will, by displacing calcium, accumulate in your bones. Radium, and the amount of radiation it emits, will build up inside you. Should it get into your drinking water system, there is no conceivable way

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mikeyd

Jan-19-14 8:16 AM

money talks.

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daWraith

Jan-19-14 8:41 AM

Yet for 55 friggen years Weirton dumped RAW SEWAGE into the Ohio River and the rocket scientists did not discover it until around 2011???

I remember as a young boy counting the number number of floating turds in the river where Big Wheeling creek joins it!

That which doesn't KILL you makes you stronger!

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WVUGEO

Jan-19-14 9:12 AM

daWraith: In point of fact, the radium might not kill you - - but it will, by displacing calcium in your bones, definitely make you weaker. And it well could, by damaging your genetic material, kill and disable your children and grandchildren. And, whoever clicked "disagree" on our previous post are simply disagreeing with facts established by scientists in and employed by our US Government, a government, that, obviously, would much prefer that the public sail along in the shale gas fantasy - - even though their own analyses clearly demonstrate the actual amount of the resource which can be recovered on a profitable or practical basis is an order of magnitude less, an order of magnitude smaller, than the true believers and public press cheerleaders would obviously prefer to have you think.

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TrollSlayer

Jan-19-14 9:21 AM

WVUGEO, since it won’t be dumped in the river and nobody will be drinking it, your comparison of radium levels in fracking flowback to effluent and drinking water standards is irrelevant. Your post is disinformation and fearmongering.

Are disinformation and fearmongering your only arugments? Apparently so. LOL

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WVUGEO

Jan-19-14 9:27 AM

One spill, as can obviously happen, of radium-laden waste, some of which gets drawn into the water intake, is all it would take to contaminate, to ruin, permanently, your public water supply system. See if the city, given the presence of the frack treatment plant, can get insurance against such a possible catastrophe.

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TrollSlayer

Jan-19-14 9:33 AM

Marcellus "see page 25 of the Congressional report from 4-18-11 "Chemicals Used in Hydraulic Fracturing.""

Interesting. Because you loons are constantly telling us nobody knows what's in fracking fluid. LOL

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TrollSlayer

Jan-19-14 9:36 AM

GEO "One spill, as can obviously happen, of radium-laden waste, some of which gets drawn into the water intake, is all it would take to contaminate, to ruin, permanently, your public water supply system."

Interesting. Because mikeyd says they dumped truckloads of fracking flowback into the river at Wellsburg every day for two months. So according to GEO's babble it's all over anyway.

Think. If there's no facility to collect and recycle or ship out all that flowback, do you think it's more likely or less likely they'll resume dumping it in the river instead? Derrrrr....

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WVUGEO

Jan-19-14 9:47 AM

Troll: They will, no doubt, continue dumping it in the river or doing whatever they want with it as long as your spiritual and intellectural brethren are, as they obviosuly for years have been, manning our watch towers.

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mkhunt

Jan-19-14 9:48 AM

do not let this happen

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conserberal

Jan-19-14 9:56 AM

The concerns of an educated public have been validated. Freedom Industries was founded by a two time felon, and GH has its own share of financial problems. Keep their toxic frack waste away from our River.

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TrollSlayer

Jan-19-14 10:03 AM

WVUGEO “as long as your spiritual and intellectural brethren are, as they obviosuly for years have been, manning our watch towers”

GEO, Demorat pols have occupied the White House for 5 years. Demorat pols have held the majority in the Senate for 7 years. Demorat pols were the majority party in the House for 4 of the last 7 years. Demorat pols have controlled West Virginia politics for decades. And the vast majority of the “watchtower” press has held a liberal bias for longer than that.

But keep blaming Republicans and a few small-town newspapers for your lack of relevant facts to support your disinformation campaign. In that small-town newspaper's own website, yet. LOL

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buffy99

Jan-19-14 10:04 AM

SO? Thers still a plant below Moundsville thats is STILL dumping waste into the river.EPA sitting on their thumbs.. as usual.

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TrollSlayer

Jan-19-14 10:08 AM

conserberal “Freedom Industries was founded by a two time felon”

Apparently our Demorat-controlled State Government didn’t notice when they issued FI’s permits and neglected to inspect their chemical storage facility for decades. LOL

conserberal “GH has its own share of financial problems”

Nothing specific to support that irrelevant smear? yawn...

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WVUGEO

Jan-19-14 10:48 AM

daTroll: From August 22, 2013, in the British-based journal"Global Water Intelligence": "'Frac’ water treatment and recycling start-up GreenHunter Resources is teetering on the verge of insolvency".

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