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O.J. Says He Needs New Trial

Former football great finally takes the stand

May 16, 2013
The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register

LAS VEGAS (AP) - His leg shackles rattling as he shuffled to and from the witness stand, O.J. Simpson made his own case Wednesday for a new trial on armed robbery charges with testimony that he relied on the advice of his trusted attorney when he tried to reclaim mementos from his football glory days.

"It was my stuff. I followed what I thought was the law," the 65-year-old former NFL star and actor said. "My lawyer told me I couldn't break into a guy's room. I didn't break into anybody's room. I didn't try to muscle the guys. The guys had my stuff, even though they claimed they didn't steal it."

Simpson said he took the advice of his longtime former lawyer, Yale Galanter, and didn't testify in his Las Vegas trial at which he was convicted in 2008 of armed robbery, kidnapping and other charges and sentenced to nine to 33 years in prison.

Article Photos

AP Photo
O.J. Simpson testifies during an evidentiary hearing in Clark County District Court, Wednesday in Las Vegas.

His fall from long-ago fame and fortune was on display as a grayer, bulkier Simpson made his way through the courtroom. The Heisman Trophy college running back and NFL record-setter once made TV commercials running through airports. As Nevada prison inmate No. 1027820, he's been handcuffed and chained at the ankles during a hearing on his claim that he was poorly represented by his attorney during the trial.

His physician, Henry Johnson, watched and said Simpson appeared to be in good health.

H. Leon Simon, attorney for the state, conducted a brief cross-examination that focused on some of the same details Simpson attorney Patricia Palm raised about advice Simpson received from his trial lawyers, Galanter and co-counsel Gabriel Grasso.

"Mr. Galanter advised me not to testify," Simpson reiterated.

"You made a decision to follow Mr. Galanter's advice, rather than Mr. Grasso's, and not testify?" Simon asked.

"Yes," Simpson said.

Simpson did acknowledge that he didn't have a legal right to take some things from the Palace Station hotel room where he and five men confronted two sports memorabilia dealers - including baseballs signed by Pete Rose and Duke Snyder and lithographs of football great Joe Montana. Simpson said he thought those items would be returned later. He said he didn't remember taking a hat from one of the dealers.

 
 
 

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