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Energy Chief: Obama Is Committed to Coal Role

July 30, 2013
By VICKI SMITH, Associated Press , The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register

MORGANTOWN - President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of Energy are committed to a role for coal in a national energy strategy, and they've backed it up with research spending, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said Monday.

In a visit to the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown - the only one of the federal government's 17 national labs dedicated to fossil fuels - Moniz said the administration has spent $6 billion on clean-coal technology with an emphasis on the capture, storage and reuse of carbon emissions.

"We have an 'all of the above' strategy, and it's real," he said.

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MONIZ

But the administration also believes the U.S. must prepare for a low-carbon economy, so scientists must help find ways to use coal and gas more cleanly.

Moniz spoke to hundreds of federal employees who work at the West Virginia lab, and to those who watched remotely from research sites and small offices in Pennsylvania, Oregon, Alaska and Texas. In all, the national lab employs 1,426 people, about 850 of whom are contractors.

Last month, Obama laid out a general plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase both the production of clean energy and energy efficiency.

That worries the coal industry and angers some of the politicians who support it, including U.S. Rep. David McKinley, a West Virginia Republican who has long questioned the science behind global warming. McKinley, who now acknowledges climate change but is not convinced human activity is to blame, accompanied Moniz on a tour of the lab but didn't speak to reporters.

Moniz said the challenges from climate change are serious. The world is already seeing the effects in more severe floods, heat waves and droughts that drive up food and energy prices. Rising temperatures also stoke more intense storms that threaten electrical grids and other key infrastructure.

"But we've always found a way to innovate our way to a more prosperous future," Moniz said, "and we will do the same in this case."

Coal and natural gas industry officials have joked about the president's commitment to an "all of the above strategy," suggesting he means all energy sources aboveground. Moniz acknowledged the skepticism in coal country but insisted the commitment is genuine.

He wouldn't predict how big the role for coal might be, saying that's up to consumers. But it will remain part of the fuel mix for decades to come.

 
 

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