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9th Ohio County Resident Dies of COVID-19 Complications

WHEELING — COVID-19 continues to take a toll on the entire Ohio Valley, claiming yet another life in Ohio County.

The Wheeling-Ohio County Health Department on Tuesday announced that a ninth county resident has died from complications related to COVID-19. According to health Administrator Howard Gamble, the individual was hospitalized at the time of their death. No additional details about that person were released. The department also announced 14 new positive cases of the coronavirus in Ohio County. It reports that a total of 550 cases have been identified since the onset of the pandemic.

Information provided by Gamble indicates that single positive COVID-19 cases have been identified at several county schools. These include teachers or staff members at St. Michael Parish School, Ritchie Elementary School and within the Ohio County Schools Transportation Department.

At Wheeling Central Catholic High School, a student tested positive.

The Wheeling-Ohio County Health Department also is monitoring three new outbreaks at facilities in Ohio County. The new outbreaks were identified at a local restaurant/bar, a social service/food establishment and a long-term care facility. The health department is still monitoring outbreaks at a local long-term care center and at a residential care facility. The outbreak associated with Wheeling Continuous Care Center is now closed.

In Marshall County, the coronavirus caseload increased by 20 on Tuesday. The Marshall County Health Department received confirmation of 13 positive and seven probable new cases.

Confirmed cases include a woman in her 50s with moderate symptoms; a woman in her 50s with mild symptoms; a woman in her 20s with mild symptoms who transferred from probable status due to confirmation testing; a woman in her 90s and a man in his 60s who are asymptomatic; a man in his 70s with mild symptoms; a woman in her 70s with mild symptoms; a woman in her 30s with mild symptoms; a woman in her 40s with mild symptoms; a woman in her 50s with moderate symptoms; a man in his 40s with mild symptoms; a man in his 60s with mild symptoms; and a woman in her 60s with mild symptoms who transferred from probable status due to confirmation testing.

The probable cases include two women in their 40s with mild symptoms; a 3-year-old boy with mild symptoms; a woman in her 20s with moderate symptoms; a man in his 30s with mild symptoms; a man in his 40s with mild symptoms; and a man in his 60s who is reporting mild symptoms.

This brings Marshall County to a total of 297 confirmed cases and 36 probable cases since the local onset of the pandemic, 82 of which are in isolation at home, five hospitalized, five associated deaths and 241 who have been released from isolation.

Community testing is scheduled to be conducted from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at the Health Department and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Cameron High School.

Across the Ohio River, more than 20 new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in Belmont County on Tuesday, bringing the number of active infections there to 128 — the most at any one time since the virus arrived in March. However, Belmont County Deputy Health Director Robert Sproul said many of the new positive patients were already quarantined due to contact with previous positive cases.

Since the pandemic’s onset, 883 Belmont County residents have tested positive and 730 have recovered. A total of 121 residents are isolated at home with active infections. The number of people hospitalized has gone from six to seven this week, and there have been 25 deaths of residents who had been infected with COVID-19, including nine inmates of the Belmont Correctional Institution, located just west of St. Clairsville.

Last week, Belmont County lost its Level 1, or yellow, status in terms of COVID-19 risk level and was designated orange, or Level 2. Many other high-risk areas along major transportation routes or with large population centers have been designated Level 3, or red. Level 4, or purple, designates the highest risk level associated with the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. So far, none of Ohio’s 88 counties has been deemed purple, but only four still retain the yellow designation.

To the south, the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department has been working with a smaller staff than usual due to some of its deputies and staff members being quarantined after a few of them tested positive for the coronavirus early last week. Sheriff Charles Black said four officers and members of the staff tested positive for the virus around Oct. 17, which led to several others in the office being quarantined due to close contact.

Black said the close contacts have not exhibited any symptoms of the virus and are set to return to work later this week.

“They should all be lifted off the quarantine list (today). Most of them will be back to work Thursday or Friday,” he said.

None of the positive cases is related to the Monroe County Jail, Black said.

The state on Tuesday reported 183 total cases in Monroe County since the pandemic began, along with 96 recovered and 18 deaths, leaving 69 active cases in the county, according to coronavirus.ohio.gov. The county is one of the four counties in the state still designated Level 1, or yellow, on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. Yellow represents the lowest level of transmission risk.

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