Attorneys: Feds To Drop Charges Against Pain Doctor Roland Chalifoux

Dr. Roland Chalifoux was Indicted on Fraud Allegations in 2017

WHEELING — Attorneys for Dr. Roland Chalifoux said federal prosecutors have filed a written motion to dismiss pending health care fraud charges against the physician, who owns Valley Pain Management in McMechen.

The charges against Chalifoux, 58, of St. Clairsville, had alleged health care fraud, mail fraud and wire fraud, according to his attorneys Ronald W. Chapman and Elgine McArdle. A 32-count federal indictment against him was filed in July 2017, but charges had been dismissed over time and just 11 were to go to trial, according to McArdle.

McArdle explained that prosecutors with the U.S. Attorneys Office for the Northern District of West Virginia first orally moved to dismiss all charges against Chalifoux during a pretrial conference on Oct. 19.

Senior U.S. District Judge Frederick P. Stamp Jr. told the federal prosecutors then they must file their request in written form with the court, and that motion was filed late Tuesday, according to McArdle. She expects the court to grant the dismissal.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of West Virginia did not immediately return calls Wednesday seeking confirmation on whether the measure had been filed.

In July 2014, the West Virginia Board of Osteopathic Medicine suspended Chalifoux’s medical license amid allegations of unsafe injection practices at the facility. State health officials accused him of reusing syringes to enter vials and saline bags used for more than one patient — not of reusing the same needles on different patients.

His license was reinstated in August 2014. In November 2015, the Board of Osteopathic Medicine officially dismissed its complaint against Chalifoux.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office later raided Chalifoux’s office in April 2015, with no reason being disclosed for the raid.

“I am incredibly relieved that this three-and-a-half-year ordeal is over,” Chalifoux said in a released statement. “I have always maintained my innocence and look forward to continuing to practice medicine and treat my patients.”

He said the allegations against stem from a previous employee of his practice, and he was grateful to his attorneys for exposing them as false.

“I would like to thank all of my patients, friends and colleagues who have stood by me and my staff during this very difficult three and a half years,” he said.

“Few Americans will understand the mental and financial burden a federal investigation places on its target — I am grateful that I am one of the few that have received vindication. I will continue to advocate for all patients suffering from various chronic pain conditions and I look forward to continuing my passion to provide top quality patient care to the residents of this community.”

McArdle said federal prosecutors had first asked for a continuance of Chalifoux’s trial, telling the judge they needed to examine 100,000 files of which they had just become aware.

The defense objected, and told the court they were ready for trial. Stamp denied the motion for a continuance, according to McArdle.

McArdle and Chapman released a joint statement Wednesday.

“We knew from the outset of this case that the prosecution’s position was deeply flawed and based on a misunderstanding of health care regulations,” they stated. “Despite many opportunities to resolve this case early, we believed in Dr. Chalifoux’s innocence and looked forward to presenting his case to the jury.

“We are pleased that Dr. Chalifoux was finally vindicated. We are glad to have taken this weight off of Dr. Chalifoux’s shoulders and we are thankful that prosecutors were ultimately receptive to our issues with this case and elected to dismiss the indictment.”

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